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the committee of any changes that have been made or are being proposed to the posture of u.s. forces overseas to respond to similar terrorist attacks in the future that we sought in benghazi. anything that will affect the dod and installations overseas. they released a timeline of its response to the assaults of september 11th and 12th and including on the deployment of various forces based in the united states or overseas. a copy of this timeline is in front of us. i think we will each have it and it will be included in the record. according to the timeline, the temporary mission facility, the department of defense's first reaction was to react on a mission of libya to provide better awareness of the events of the events in benghazi. there were a series of meetings in the pentagon for expanding the department of defense's response as well as to prepare for the potential outbreak of further violence throughout the region. during these meetings, secretary panetta authorized a number of deployments. i hope that secretary panetta and the chairman will provide the committee with detail on the cir
house just fine drone strikes on u.s. citizens overseas. nbc news reported on the memo monday night and it has gotten lots of reaction in washington. what are your thoughts? call -- we want to get your thoughts on social media as well on twitter or facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get your thoughts in a moment. first, josh gerstein is joining us on the phone. here's your headline -- what was this memo? guest: this is a white paper that looks like it was derived from some confidential legal opinions that the opinions -- opinions that the justice department wrote that authorized drones or some other counter-terrorism operations to basically killed u.s. citizens overseas. and it talks about one set of circumstances. it looks like it is talking specifically about a particular country or type of country or certain type of leaders or terrorist organizations and under what conditions it would be ok to use this type of lethal force. it does not talk about drones per say, but it appears that is what they are referring to. if it does not rule out using its under other circumstances. it
to go. >> any member of al qaeda, a u.s. citizen or not, needs to know they have the ability to surrender anytime, anywhere throughout the world, and they can do so before their organization is to strike. we will destroy that organization, and u.s. citizens can surrender anytime. >> just on that point, i do not take a back seat to anybody in terms of citing al qaeda. i asked you a different question, and on the question of what kind of evidence ought to be applied, whether there ought to be geographic limits, the question of whether an individual should be allowed to surrender. for example, there is a question of whether the obligation changes, a valid target has not been publicly reported, so there are issues here, and i think we are going to have to continue discussions, and, madam, i look forward to the extra round. >> senator coats. >> i think it may be better held for further discussion next week in the classified room, but this whole idea of leaks, nothing upsets me more in this committee, and we have had a lot of these in the last few years, to see something that was d
at sigtarp and was also at the u.s. securities and exchange commission who -- and served as counsel to mary schapiro and christopher cox. and investigative financial fraud, insider trading and other violations of securities law. she spent time as a litigator. her jd is from brigham young law school and she went to school here, old dominion university. the special inspector general from tarp and a recent report. treasury continues approving excessive -- excessive pay. on twitter -- is this all hindsight? guest: it is interesting. one of the things we constantly report on is things that should have been done better. you have to respect that a lot of decisions were made with a sense of urgency. but the compensation decisions were not. there was plenty of time to set up a good system for that. and even for the discount -- for the decisions that were made in a rush, it is really important we point out how things could have been done better. let's say we get and the situation where there is another crisis. and treasury and the regulators are running around with a sense of courtesy in an emergency
much of the public and congress should know about the u.s. drove stride program. we would like to hear your opinion. what is the balance between government secrecy and the public's right to know? here are the numbers to call -- you can also find us online -- here is the headline in "the baltimore sun" this morning. brennan targeted over drones. looking at some of the opinions coming in on the editorial pages of the newspapers. "usa today" -- that is of the newspaper's editorial board opinion. jumping down, it says -- the opposing view that "usa today" publishes to give a counterpoint says end the u.s. -- covert drone war. naureen shah at columbia's human-rights institute writes -- she points out the war is waged secretly because the pakistani and yemen government have the time feared their citizens would oppose open u.s. and all -- involvement. what do you think? what is more important, government secrecy or the public's right to know? let's hear from walter from butler, indiana. a republican. are you with us? last time for walter. caller: yes, ma'am. hello? thank you for taking my cal
. meanwhile on tuesday, pakistan's ambassador to the u.s. discussed the issue of drone attacks saying strikes are indirect violation of international law and her events came at an event hosted by the "christian science monitor." >> i want to ask you about the drones. pakistan's position is that the drone strikes are a violation of your sovreignty and international law and i think under both of those guidelines you have the right to self-defense. and further, just to guide your answer, has pakistan threatened to shoot down drones, and if not, why not? the reason i ask this is because there is an understanding that while pakistan publicly opposes the strike, privately it sort of winks. >> let me address this as most people do to speak to what they can in terms of the question put and it's an important question and you do ask -- you ask a question which many ask, is there a quiet come policity in this. let me assure you, there is no question of quiet come policity or wink and nod. this is a parliamentary red line all government institutions have internalized as policy. and you know, i say this a
that is the biggest window. that is not over populated by u.s. capacity and capability. it is not religious. it is a it is not religious. we can extend it as needed. it should make us be more urgent. we find that when we bring urgency to almost any discussion inside of the u.s. government is a constructive thing to do. >> there are a number of areas in the u.s. government that look at failed and failing state. the undersecretary for political affairs has that responsibility. dns see used to chair and -- the nsc used to chair a committee. how does cso play into this? >> we try to work with everyone that you mentioned. we want to be aggregators of talent and good work that has gone on. for example, something as simple as analytics, we have a metadata analyst in our shop now, but we want him to be an aggregator of aggregators. i keep saying you have to be made silver on steroids -- nate silver on steroids. we cannot run enough staff to review and it turns out the intelligence community loves being called by the state department. they are flattered by it. they want their wo
will discuss what he thought the u.s. could have done -- stanley mcchrystal and discussed what he thought the u.s. could have done better. the retired four-star general commanded special operations in iraq and all u.s. forces in afghanistan and his resignation in 2010. this event is about 90 minutes. terrorist zarqawi, but also many of the procedures that led to the finding and killing of bin laden. the success of joint special operations command is one of the most important stories in the broader war on terror. we are honored that roos will be -- bruce riedel will be interviewing general mcchrystal this morning. this is based on the recent book, which i hope you a purchase, which we are proud to be discussing, my share of the task -- "my share of the task," its describes the role of not only command, but also other military personnel and international personnel that he worked with. just a couple more words about our panelists. bruce was a 30-year cia veteran before joining brookings in 2006. at the cia, he did a number of things, including working at nato headquarters. he was an advisor to four
the legal justification for the treatment of terrorist detainees in u.s. custody. within months of taking office released several olc memos describing the legal justification for the treatment of terrorist detainees in u.s. custody. do you think it was appropriate that a different standard was applied to the release of the memos from the bush administration than those produced by the obama administration? >> i do not think there was a different standard. >> one was released within four months of the obama administration taking office. the other had been requested for a much longer time. >> i am not a lawyer. i have come to learn of the term sui generis. the olc memos released after the president came into office were released because the program was terminated. olc will counsel opinions, and those opinions were looked at in a different way because of the sui generis circumstances. >> both are essential for the ability of congress to carry its oversight responsibilities. finally, the intelligence reform act and terrorist prevention act of 2004, with which you are very familiar and which i
in the u.s. ia, the united states information agency, and he wrote the screenplay for the memorial film about jfk, the man who fought a lot about american history. he disagreed with my approach from the get go. well before the controversies of bringing in john d.. he said every president has a right to a watering hole. there are all those who admires him who can go and speak and not have to worry about the judgment of history. if it is ahat's true private facility. but the minute you make it belic, i think it can't published--- cannot be governed by those rules. again, i don't think the public recognizes that it has a choice. if you go to the different presidential libraries, you'll find this among them are shrines and others are places of serious discussion. the harry truman, for example, is a place of serious discussion. the johnson library is redoing its museum. i haven't seen it yet, but i suspect it will be a place for serious discussion. and there are others that are not. i think the public needs to figure out what they want. " your office is and what -- >> your office is in what
the economy. we need to spend money to exist. in the u.s., you just cannot stop spending money. if you do, it will be the end of us. these people are haters. they are not going to change the way they think. thank god there are enough people in this country who think progressively. maybe we can turn this economy around and help america. have a nice day. host: robert brings up the sequestration. we will talk about that later with ray locker of "usa today." he will talk about the sequestration's effect on defense spending. that will be and about 25 minutes. we want to show you more of the president's speech four years ago and elkhart, indiana where he can each -- pitched his economic plan. he talks about the people who have lost their livelihood. [video clip]>> nearly 600,000 in the past month alone. when we say that this area has lost jobs faster than anywhere else in the united states of america, with an unemployment rate of over national security editor $1.2 trillion% when it was 4.7% just last year. we talk about layoffs in companies like keystone rv. companies that have sustained this
the circumstances in which such force is directed against u.s. citizens and non- citizens alike. i have been attempting to speak publicly about the very low number of civilian casualties that result from such strikes. but for the past several years, this committee has done significant oversight of the government's knowledge of targeted strikes, and the figures we have obtained from the executive branch, which we have done have confirmed that the number of civilian casualties that have resulted from such strikes each year has typically been in the single digits. when i asked to give out the actual numbers, i am told you cannot, and i say why not? because it is classified. it is a covert program. for the public, it does not exist. well, i think that rationale, mr. brennan, is long gone, and i will talk to you about that because i think it is very important that we share this data with people. this committee will continue to perform significant oversight of targeted strikes. we received this morning and office of legal counsel opinion on the topic. actually, we received a short one and a long o
clinton has been an advocate for the u.s. military. that is really why we honor her today. she has been a champion for our service members and veterans. she has been a forceful voice for american leadership in the world. this morning we are honored to be able to honor her the highest award of this department. it is the highest award we can bestow. as i said, i'm extremely proud of my association with hillary over these last two decades. about 20 years ago last month when i first joined the clinton administration as director of the office of management and budget, it was a different world then. think about the political challenges we had then. health care issues, partisan gridlock, budget deficit. [laughter] on second thought, the only thing that has changed is that hillary and i are older and perhaps a little wiser and a little less patient, particularly with political dysfunction, a little less tolerant of b.s. in general. and it is probably a good thing at this point in time that we have a chance to get some damn rest. [laughter] i'm going to have a broad smile as she does hopefully i
of targeted force for over a year, including the circumstances in which such force is directed against u.s. citizens and non-citizens alike. i have been attempting to speak publicly about the very low number of civilian casualties that result from such strikes. . but for the past several years, this committee has done significant oversight of the government's, but of targeted strikes and the figures we have obtained from the executive branch, which we have done have confirmed that the number of civilian casualties that have resulted from such strikes each year has typically been in the single digits. when i asked to give out the actual numbers, i am told you cannot, and i say why not? because it is classified. it is a covert program. for the public, it does not exist. well, i think that rationale, mr. brennan, is long gone, and i will talk to you about that because i think it is very important that we share this data with people. this committee will continue to perform significant oversight of targeted strikes. we received this morning and office of legal counsel opinion on the topic. actu
government in massachusetts. nearly 30 years as a u.s. senator. the only committee that he served on from the day he became a senator, until its last day in the center of the foreign relations committee. he grew up with a father in the foreign service. it is a family calling. i will count it as a joy but as a bittersweet sadness that my service in the senate, i got to serve with him on the foreign relations committee for one week. [laughter] i am the junior senator on that committee. i sit far out on the wing on that committee. it was the first committee vote i cast was to confirm him as the new secretary. senator, you are coming to a place that believes deeply in the values that you share, as robert mentioned. president jefferson strongly believed in the connection of this wonderful exemplary nations to a world community. we have been a global leader. i always like to think about the global leadership that tries to balance military strength. secretary kerry knows the importance and limits of that spirit diplomatic strength, the strength of our economy, the strength of our moral example,
of the subcommittee. i am looking forward to working with the ranking members as we both share a commitment to u.s. border security and ensuring our board agents -- ensuring our border agents receive the support they need to protect homeland. also look forward to a strong bipartisan cooperation in helping to make the department of home as security as efficient and effective as possible. i would also like to introduce our new freshmen majority members. we have mr. richard hudson of north carolina. later joining us will be stephen from montana. they bring a welcome experience to their new roles in congress and the subcommittee. i look for to leveraging their experience and knowledge to provide effective oversight of hds. -- of dhs. i think the subcommittee staffer diligently working together to put this hearing together. thank you for that. i now recognize myself for an opening statement. next month marks 10 years since the creation of the dhs with the homeless security act of 2001. the attacks on september 11 forced to rethink our approach to defining the homeland. as the commission report document
type of u.s. counter-terrorism activities that involve the dropping of ordnance. whether it is a remotely piloted aircraft or man, we need to take that into account, but i would not agree with those statements because what we have found in many areas is that the people are being held hostage to outcry that in these areas and have welcomed the work that the government has done to rid them of the al qaeda cancer that exists. >> finally today, this committee received the olc memos justification, labo that, many of us who have been on the committee longer than i, have been seeking for some time, and i to have spent a large part of this morning reading them. yet the obama administration within months of taking office released several olc memos describing the legal justification for the treatment of terrorist detainees in u.s. custody. do you think it was appropriate that a different standard was applied to the release of the memos from the bush administration than those produced by the obama administration? >> i do not think there was a different standard. >> one was released
. i went to the german embassy in 2007. the ambassador had all of the ambassadors to the u.s. i said let's talk about detention and interrogation. i laid it out. let me give you four sentences. we believe we are a nation at war with al qaeda and the affiliates. my moral and legal responsibility is to take it to that enemy. there's not another country in the room who agreed with any of those four sentences. they not only rejected it for them, they had serious questions about the legitimacy of the questions for us. sometimes you have to forgo things that in your mind are ethical, legal, and effective because secondary and tertiary effects of taking that course of action may make you less effective. let's take target of killing. i said on cnn sunday morning, there was a time -- i knew there were secondary effects was the primary effect was so important because of the degree of danger that existed at the time. now the environment as changed the degree is somewhat different. now those effects might become dominant. yes, i can see a down side for doing things that you believe are effective
is all about. >> according to the a.t.f. in 2011, 6.2 million pistols were sold in the u.s. 2.3 million rifles, 872,000 shotguns and 573,000 revolvers. larry pratt is our guest. by the way, the national rifle association was invivetted to participate in this program and they declined. blue ridge arsenal is our base this morning in virginia for the next couple of hours. we'll be talking to employees and looking at products and services that blue ridge arsenal gun shop rage provides as we take calls with our guest larry pratt. we have a call from michigan. caller: my message and reaction to comments i heard -- i haven't heard anything as far as what has been brought forth yet. why larry, do we not see -- when a gun was purchased at a -- by a dealer, why do we not see or why we haven't heard a gun lock be issued by a federal basis or by some means of standard gun lock with the southeasterly number with that particular -- serial number with that gun. they open the trunk of a person's car or vehicle and there's a gun in the back. it is an ar, it is out of the case. you go through the formali
on rules in the u.s. and its. there were four democrats, for republicans. it was a diverse group of senators including senator mccain, senator kyl, senator pryor, senator schumer. it was a group -- senator levin was our leader on the democratic side. we came up with reforms that i think will help. the cannot filibuster bringing a bill to the board. rather now where the minority cannot vote against cloture because they are doing it on a procedural basis. the bill will now be before us. it will get started in debate and voting on amendments before we have to worry about whether we need 60 votes for the threshold. secondly, there is a limit on how you can filibuster. we can bring the president's judicial nominees up in a much quicker way. there, you have eliminated two of the potentials on going to conference. getting into conference is particularly important in going to this congress. the most significant reform, we have dramatically reduced the power of an individual senator. if you are going to object, you need to do it on the floor of the u.s. senate. you can no longer be in you
dempsey testify about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya, that killed ambassador christopher stevens and others. we will be live with the armed services committee starting at 10:00 a.m. on c-span. later, john brennan, the cia director joyce, testifying before the senate committee. he is expected to face questions on the cia drone program. we will be live with this program starting at 2:30 p.m. eastern also on c-span. >> if you go to most american history textbooks, if you go to the back of the textbooks you have in the basement, you can take me up on my bet. my bet with you is that in your american history textbooks in high school, you'll find no mention of eugenics. if you go to your biology books, you will find no mention of the word "eugenics. a biology books signed by most of the places, montana university, great textbooks, but i did not see any mention of eugenics. that is because we, scientists, no longer believe in eugenics, so we do not have to study it anymore. it was so awful that we can somehow pretend it is not part of american culture. >> part of lect
are being held across the u.s. today. -- forward on climate rally. >> give me some music. come on. oh, yeah. let's go. come on. we say no, you say keystone. no. keystone. no. keystone. no keystone pipeline. no keystone pipeline. no keystone pipeline. no keystone pipeline. come on. no keystone pipeline. come on. no keystone pipeline. >> oh, yeah. make some noise! "s.o.s." by sting] >> thank year, thank you, thank you. it's a lot will warm. they say where we are right now is at least 30,000 strong. let me say this as we get started. right here, not too far away of the lincoln memorial, dr. king -- 50 years ago -- yes. august 20th, 1963, they marched for jobs and freedom. they marched for equality. they marched so we could come together as black-and-white, brown, yellow, red, male, female, straight, gave we could all come together account as united. united against what appe? this rally it 50 years later is as important of not more important than the rally them. while they were fighting for quality, we're fighting for existence. so that in 2063, but years from now, they will look back door and
life. i have been david and i have raised two children here. i have been a u.s. attorney for this area, and starting last month one of the hoosier state voices in the us house of representatives. i am proud to live in a state that spends less than it takes in, has a aaa credit rating and a budget surplus that will be partially repay to taxpayers areas the secret to our state success has been a value system that promotes a strong sense of responsibility and accountability. as family members, taxpayers, and community volunteers. for too long, the democratic majority in washington has failed to see the value in the sound model of working hard and living within your means. on their watch, we have been operating without a national budget. piling up debts that now exceed $60 trillion, and unemployment levels that remain stubbornly high. we are again at risk at having our credit rating downgraded. the spite these challenges, americans concerned about our nation spending problem may now have cause for optimism. i recent be voted along with my colleagues in the house for a simple but powerful c
a class on u.s. defense budgeting. at georgetown, we do care about these issues and we share your concerns, as well. in the defense budget of 2013, i understand 19% of the budget is being represented for personnel. about 26% is for procurement. 40% is for operations. if you look at all the different accounts for which the budget is requested, and the sequestration cuts across the board will affect seriously to the manpower, the modernization, and the leadership of the military. i have reviewed a lot of documents of the defense budget for many years in the past. i do not see a way how we can cut the defense budget. i do not see a way how sequestration will occur and not affect these three crucial defense-related areas. now, knowing that only around 4% of the gdp is being constituted by the base defense budget, and a bulk of the gdp -- >> we agree on your fax. what is the question? [laughter] >> right. this is a puzzle to me. my question is, this is really a puzzle. [laughter] how can you balance the budget without either cutting the defense budget or the mandatory account, medicare, medicai
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)